Nov
3
2020

Bad Memes.

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I love dumb memes. Here’s one I came across tonight. The idea that Hunter Biden has no energy industry experience has long been a talking point for the right when attacking him and his service on the Burisma board of directors. I’ve challenged people to pick at random 20 BOD’s of companies to see how many have “industry experience” relating to the product or service the company sells / provides.Since Exxon Mobil is mentioned, here are the personnel serving on their Board Of Directors:

Susan K. Avery – No energy industry experience.

Angela F. Bralyy – No energy industry experience.

Ursula M. Burns – Same.

Kenneth C. Frazier – Same.

Steven A. Kandarian – Same.

Douglas R. Oberhelman – Same.

Samuel J. Palmisano – Same.

William C. Weldon – Same.

Darren W. Woods – He’s the only guy on the board who has past energy industry experience.

They really need better talking points.

Apr
26
2020

Sweden… The Great Example Of How To Handle Covid 19… Or Are They?

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Sweden… The Great Example Of How To Handle Covid 19… Or are they?

People have recently started to notice that Sweden has been able to avert “disaster” without resorting to “lockdown” measures. A couple of things to note about Sweden vs the US and other countries. First, Sweden’s healthcare system is top notch, and nationalized. They were quicker to gear up faster than other countries, especially the US, once Covid was identified as a problem. Due to its centralized healthcare system, they were able to develop a much more broad testing capacity and were able to find enough people who were carriers early on and isolate them before they were able to spread Covid to too many people.

They are doing well. But their neighbors Finland and Norway, countries that took stricter measures, have a much lower death rate per capita of Covid than Sweden.

As of April 26, Sweden’s Covid death count is 215 per million.

Finland is 33.5
Norway is 35.6

Note: Sweden has a higher death rate right now than the US. We are at 160.69 deaths per million. California looks to be about 40 per.

The bigger picture? We are only barely even a month into Covid being a truly worldwide pandemic. The stats at this point are more like the snap-shot memories of a three year old human than that of an adult. We need more time to really know how Covid infections trend in societies and nations. The availability of widespread testing for both infection and antibodies is key to filling in the blanks. A LOT of things will happen in the next nine months.

Apr
19
2020

Archived For Rich Merritt

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“Who knew we shouldn’t reopen everything on May 1st? Nobody knew. No one saw a second wave coming.”

~Donald J. Trump July 3rd, 2020

Apr
1
2020

“Because You Lefties Would Rather Trump Fail At Any Cost.”

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On facebook, in a discussion about the recent action of the FDA approving limited treatment of Covid infection by using Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine, I, and “lefties” in general, were accused of “not want a treatments to be identified”.

Me, the “leftie”: “Why would the lefties “not want a treatments to be identified”?

Righty: “Because you lefties would rather Trump fail at any cost.”

Ummmmmmm…. OK. Let’s first look at the reasons us lefties were being cautious about using the drugs.

First: The evidence that they work for Covid infection is scant. Some research suggests they work in-vitro (in a test tube) but the two main studies on this that show any results are, to put it mildly, crap. The isn’t much of a control group, and the PCR (polymerse chian reaction) tests that indicate Covid infection, are mishandled. This doesn’t mean the drugs DON’T work, but the evidence that they do are anecdotal and further study is needed.

Second: These drugs do have side effects, and the drugs can interfere with other drugs.

Third: There have been several people who were injured and a few had died because this irresponsible President singled out the drugs in a press conference, making them sound like magic bullets to fight Covid. That was irresponsible at best. I’m hoping that the FDA’s approval of the drug is science based and not due to political pressure. It’s not like that hasn’t happened before.

In short; us lefties are not opposed to researching the use of the drugs to see if they’ll work, or even using them in the field under strict supervision. Use whatever tools are needed. But don’t overhype.

Now, on the the charge that “you lefties would rather Trump fail at any cost.”

Here’s the timeline on what us lefties and the horrible Trump-hating news media have been saying since the virus was first identified in China:

  • DEC 30 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • DEC 31 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 1 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 2 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 3 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 4 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 5 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 6 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 7 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 8 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 9 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 10 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 11 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 12 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 13 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 14 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 15 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 16 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 17 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 18 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 19 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 20 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 21 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 22 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 23 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 24 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 25 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 26 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 27 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 28 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 29 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • JAN 30 – This could be bad. We need to take it seriously.
  • Repeat for February and March.

What was Trump saying during this time???

Jan. 22: “We have it totally under control. It’s one person coming in from China. We have it under control. It’s going to be just fine.” — Trump in a CNBC interview.

Jan. 30: “We think we have it very well under control. We have very little problem in this country at this moment — five — and those people are all recuperating successfully. But we’re working very closely with China and other countries, and we think it’s going to have a very good ending for us … that I can assure you.” — Trump in a speech in Michigan.

Feb. 10: “Now, the virus that we’re talking about having to do — you know, a lot of people think that goes away in April with the heat — as the heat comes in. Typically, that will go away in April. We’re in great shape though. We have 12 cases — 11 cases, and many of them are in good shape now.” — Trump at the White House. (See our item “Will the New Coronavirus ‘Go Away’ in April?“)

Feb. 14: “There’s a theory that, in April, when it gets warm — historically, that has been able to kill the virus.  So we don’t know yet; we’re not sure yet. But that’s around the corner.” — Trump in speaking to National Border Patrol Council members.

Feb. 23: “We have it very much under control in this country.” — Trump in speaking to reporters.

Feb. 24: “The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA. We are in contact with everyone and all relevant countries. CDC & World Health have been working hard and very smart. Stock Market starting to look very good to me!” — Trump in a tweet.

Feb. 26: “So we’re at the low level. As they get better, we take them off the list, so that we’re going to be pretty soon at only five people. And we could be at just one or two people over the next short period of time. So we’ve had very good luck.” — Trump at a White House briefing.

Feb. 26: “And again, when you have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero, that’s a pretty good job we’ve done.” — Trump at a press conference.

Feb. 26: “I think every aspect of our society should be prepared. I don’t think it’s going to come to that, especially with the fact that we’re going down, not up. We’re going very substantially down, not up.” — Trump at a press conference, when asked if “U.S. schools should be preparing for a coronavirus spreading.”

Feb 26: “This is a flu. This is like a flu”; “Now, you treat this like a flu”; “It’s a little like the regular flu that we have flu shots for. And we’ll essentially have a flu shot for this in a fairly quick manner.”

Feb. 27: “It’s going to disappear. One day — it’s like a miracle — it will disappear.” — Trump at a White House meeting with African American leaders.

Feb. 29: “And I’ve gotten to know these professionals. They’re incredible. And everything is under control. I mean, they’re very, very cool. They’ve done it, and they’ve done it well. Everything is really under control.” — Trump in a speech at the CPAC conference outside Washington, D.C.

March 4: “[W]e have a very small number of people in this country [infected]. We have a big country. The biggest impact we had was when we took the 40-plus people [from a cruise ship]. … We brought them back. We immediately quarantined them. But you add that to the numbers. But if you don’t add that to the numbers, we’re talking about very small numbers in the United States.” — Trump at a White House meeting with airline CEOs.

March 4: “Well, I think the 3.4% is really a false number.” — Trump in an interview on Fox News, referring to the percentage of diagnosed COVID-19 patients worldwide who had died, as reported by the World Health Organization. (See our item “Trump and the Coronavirus Death Rate.”)

March 7: “No, I’m not concerned at all. No, we’ve done a great job with it.” — Trump, when asked by reporters if he was concerned about the arrival of the coronavirus in the Washington, D.C., area. 

March 9: “So last year 37,000 Americans died from the common Flu. It averages between 27,000 and 70,000 per year. Nothing is shut down, life & the economy go on. At this moment there are 546 confirmed cases of CoronaVirus, with 22 deaths. Think about that!” — Trump in a tweet.

March 10: “And we’re prepared, and we’re doing a great job with it. And it will go away. Just stay calm. It will go away.” — Trump after meeting with Republican senators.

Yes. “Stay calm. It will go away.”

Mar 13: “National emergency, two big words.”

Mar 13: “I take no responsibility at all

And the denial and pseudo-acknowledgement of the true nature of the situation goes on and on through the month, until yesterday, March 31st.

What was Trump doing to stem the spread of the virus? It’s not as if he wasn’t doing anything, but he wasn’t taking the threat seriously. Our Federal leadership have been weeks behind individual states, and countries, that did heed the warning. In both words and action, it’s stunningly clear to all but his cult followers that President Trump was not treating this with the same urgency that us lefties were screaming at the top of our lungs to do.

“Because you lefties would rather Trump fail at any cost.”

No. We DIDN’T want him to fail. We desperately wanted him NOT to fail here. Because failure meant death. Unfortunately, he failed anyway.

Mar
31
2020

Covid-19… The Spectacular Trump Impeachment Defense.

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The newest in a long line of defenses against criticism of Donald Trump’s inadequate response to the Covis-19 pandemic is that impeachment hampered his response to deal with the oncoming crisis.

OK. Let’s look at that.

The impeachment process started on December 18th 2019, and ended on February 5th, 2020. Through the procedure in the House, the Trump administration did not participate; no effort or time was taken by the executive to participate in the hearings. They simply withheld all evidence and proclaimed the whole thing a “hoax”. When it got to the Senate, the only time they took was to meet with Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and then present a defense of nothing but talking points on January 25. On January 31st, the Senate had their final in-house session on impeachment, with no involvement from the executive branch. The final vote occurred on February 5th, again requiring no involvement from the executive branch.

Meanwhile, from Trump’s own campaign website detailing all the beautiful things he’s done to lead the fight against the Coronavirus spread, these are the things that his own team says he had done to that point:

December 31: China reports the discovery of the coronavirus to the World Health Organization.

January 6: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a travel notice for Wuhan, China due to the spreading coronavirus.

January 7: The CDC established a coronavirus incident management system to better share and respond to information about the virus.

January 11: The CDC issued a Level I travel health notice for Wuhan, China.

January 17: The CDC began implementing public health entry screening at the 3 U.S. airports that received the most travelers from Wuhan – San Francisco, New York JFK, and Los Angeles.

January 20: Dr. Fauci announces the National Institutes of Health is already working on the development of a vaccine for the coronavirus.

January 21: The CDC activated its emergency operations center to provide ongoing support to the coronavirus response.

January 23: The CDC sought a “special emergency authorization” from the FDA to allow states to use its newly developed coronavirus test.

January 27: The CDC issued a level III travel health notice urging Americans to avoid all nonessential travel to China due to the coronavirus.

January 29: The White House announced the formation of the Coronavirus Task Force to help monitor and contain the spread of the virus and provide updates to the President. 

January 31: The Trump Administration:

  • Declared the coronavirus a public health emergency.
     
  • Announced Chinese travel restrictions.
     
  • Suspended entry into the United States for foreign nationals who pose a risk of transmitting the coronavirus.

January 31: The Department of Homeland Security took critical steps to funnel all flights from China into just 7 domestic U.S. airports.

February 3: The CDC had a team ready to travel to China to obtain critical information on the novel coronavirus, but were in the U.S. awaiting permission to enter by the Chinese government.

February 4: President Trump vowed in his State of the Union Address to “take all necessary steps” to protect Americans from the coronavirus.

OK. So which is it?

Did the executive branch do a great job handling the spread of the virus as the campaign is telling us? Or did the impeachment cause the President not to act, which goes against what the campaign is saying on the website???

The dumbest thing is… Most of the criticism of how Trump has handled this crisis concern events that happened and steps not taken AFTER impeachment was long over.

Mar
29
2020

Covid 19… Trump’s Failure.

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For those who think Trump acted quickly and did great….

Sorry. You’re wrong.



The Covid-19 virus arrived in South Korea on January 20th, 2020. It arrived in the US a day later. By March 17th, they were conducting about 15,000 tests a day and had conducted about 250,000 tests by that time. That gave them the ability to quickly find its citizen who were infected and isolate them to prevent further spread of the disease. We ended up in a situation that is the exact opposite. I’m writing this ten days later and we still have no clue how many of our citizens have it and are infecting others. I came down with an illness this week and was scared that I might have it. And I have no way to find out. Since I have no fever, it’s probably not Covid, but I still can’t rule it out. And there are more than enough examples out there of American who still don’t take this seriously and will spread this even further. I’m not going to link to those stories as they are ubiquitous and easy to find.

Fans of Trump will protest and say their President has done a great job in dealing with the Covid pandemic. He is not the first President to deal with a viral outbreak. Lets compare the response to the Covid 19 outbreak to that of the Obama administration and it’s response to N1H1.

This is the list of actions as featured on the CDC webpage concerning H1N1. Forgive the formatting errors. I’m copying this over and the way that page is designed makes it difficult to be consistent.

April 15
  • First human infection with new influenza A H1N1 virus detected in California.
  • April 17
    • Second human infection with the new influenza A H1N1 virus detected in California about 130 miles away from first infection, with no known connection to previous patient.
  • April 18
    • First novel 2009 H1N1 flu infections were reported by CDC to the World Health Organization (WHO) through the U.S. International Health Regulations Program.
  • April 21
    • CDC publicly reported the first two U.S. infections with the new H1N1 virus.
    • CDC began working to develop a candidate vaccine virus.
  • April 23
  • Two additional human infections with 2009 H1N1 were detected in Texas, transforming the investigation into a multistate outbreak and response.
April 22
  • CDC activated it’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC).
April 25
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) declared a public health emergency of international concern.
April 24
  • CDC uploaded complete gene sequences of new H1N1 2009 virus to a publically-accessible international influenza database.

Note: The CDC under the Obama administration is making the information to create both tests and future vaccines publicly available.

April 26
  • The United States Government declared 2009 H1N1 a Public Health Emergency of International Concern and CDC began releasing 25% of antiviral drugs needed to treat this new influenza virus from the federal stockpile.
April 28
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new CDC test to detect 2009 H1N1 infections
  • CDC issued the first CDC Interim Guidance on Closing Schools and Childcare Facilities, recommending a 7-day dismissal in affected schools and childcare facilities with laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza A H1N1 virus.

Note: The Obama administration is already considering and planning for school closings if that becomes necessary.

May 1
  • Domestic and global shipments of new CDC test to detect 2009 H1N1 began.
  • CDC updated the CDC Interim Guidance on Closing Schools and Childcare Facilities, recommending affected communities with lab-confirmed cases of influenza A H1N1 consider adopting school dismissal and childcare closing measures, including closing for up to 14 days depending on the extent and severity of influenza illness.

Note: The Obama administration has a working reliable test being rolled out less than three weeks after the very first case of N1H1 is discovered.

  • May 4
    • CDC shifted from reporting confirmed cases of 2009 H1N1 to reporting both confirmed and probable cases of 2009 H1N1.
  • May 5
    • Peak school dismissal day in the spring phase of the pandemic. 980 schools were dismissed, affecting 607,778 students.

Note: less than a month after the very first case of N1H1 was detected in the world, the Obama administration had already started closing schools that were in areas that had high levels of H1N1 infections.

June 11
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic and raised the worldwide pandemic alert level to phase 6, which means the virus was spreading to other parts of the world.
  • CDC held its first press conference with former CDC Director Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH. The press conference had 2,355 participants.
June 19
  • All 50 states, the District of Colombia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands had reported cases of 2009 H1N1 infection.
June 25
  • CDC estimated at least 1 million cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza had occurred in the United States.

OK. Now lets use the same data as provided by the CDC on the progress the Trump administration has made on combating the Covid-19 outbreak.

….

Oops!

We can’t seem to find the page you were looking for. Please try our search or A-Z index.

OK. So there is no timeline there. But lucky for us, the Trump campaign team has provided a timeline for us. Yes, his campaign is using tremendous / huge / beautiful the “Chinese Virus” as a campaign talking point.

December 31: China reports the discovery of the coronavirus to the World Health Organization.

January 6: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a travel notice for Wuhan, China due to the spreading coronavirus.

January 7: The CDC established a coronavirus incident management system to better share and respond to information about the virus.

January 11: The CDC issued a Level I travel health notice for Wuhan, China.

Note: Even though there is plenty of valid criticism to be levied at China over their initial handling of the novel coronavirus as it was called the, by this time they had given the WHO the genetic map of the virus, which means that the creation of test kits was now possible.

January 17: The CDC began implementing public health entry screening at the 3 U.S. airports that received the most travelers from Wuhan – San Francisco, New York JFK, and Los Angeles.

January 20: Dr. Fauci announces the National Institutes of Health is already working on the development of a vaccine for the coronavirus.

January 21: The CDC activated its emergency operations center to provide ongoing support to the coronavirus response.

Note: The first case of Covid 19 had been found in the continental US.

January 23: The CDC sought a “special emergency authorization” from the FDA to allow states to use its newly developed coronavirus test.

January 27: The CDC issued a level III travel health notice urging Americans to avoid all nonessential travel to China due to the coronavirus.

January 29: The White House announced the formation of the Coronavirus Task Force to help monitor and contain the spread of the virus and provide updates to the President. 

January 31: The Trump Administration:

  • Declared the coronavirus a public health emergency.
     
  • Announced Chinese travel restrictions.
     
  • Suspended entry into the United States for foreign nationals who pose a risk of transmitting the coronavirus.

Note: There is a huge loophole to those travel restrictions that will be addressed shortly.

January 31: The Department of Homeland Security took critical steps to funnel all flights from China into just 7 domestic U.S. airports.

February 3: The CDC had a team ready to travel to China to obtain critical information on the novel coronavirus, but were in the U.S. awaiting permission to enter by the Chinese government.

February 4: President Trump vowed in his State of the Union Address to “take all necessary steps” to protect Americans from the coronavirus.

February 6: The CDC began shipping CDC-Developed test kits for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus to U.S. and international labs.

Note: The test kits would turn out to be faulty and not accurate.

February 9: The White House Coronavirus Task Force briefed governors from across the nation at the National Governors’ Association Meeting in Washington.

February 11: The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) expanded a partnership with Janssen Research & Development to “expedite the development” of a coronavirus vaccine.

February 12: The U.S. shipped test kits for the 2019 novel coronavirus to approximately 30 countries who lacked the necessary reagents and other materials.

February 12: The CDC was prepared to travel to China but had yet to receive permission from the Chinese government.

February 14: The CDC began working with five labs to conduct “community-based influenza surveillance” to study and detect the spread of coronavirus.

February 18: HHS announced it would engage with Sanofi Pasteur in an effort to quickly develop a coronavirus vaccine and to develop treatment for coronavirus infections.

February 24: The Trump Administration sent a letter to Congress requesting at least $2.5 billion to help combat the spread of the coronavirus.

February 26: President Trump discussed coronavirus containment efforts with Indian PM Modi and updated the press on his Administration’s containment efforts in the U.S. during his state visit to India.

February 29: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed certified labs to develop and begin testing coronavirus testing kits while reviewing pending applications.

Note: Missing from the campaign talking points is the public admission that the first tests produced by the Trump CDC were defective and gave way too many false positives.

February 29: The Trump Administration:

  • Announced a level 4 travel advisory to areas of Italy and South Korea.
     
  • Barred all travel to Iran.
     
  • Barred the entry of foreign citizens who visited Iran in the last 14 days.

March 3: The CDC lifted federal restrictions on coronavirus testing to allow any American to be tested for coronavirus, “subject to doctor’s orders.”

Note: There still aren’t enough tests available for this to make a difference… And it should have been lifted far sooner.

March 3: The White House announced President Trump donated his fourth quarter salary to fight the coronavirus.

$100,000 is not a lot of money for this kind of endeavor.

March 4: The Trump Administration announced the purchase of approximately 500 million N95 respirators over the next 18 months to respond to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus.

March 4: Secretary Azar announced that HHS was transferring $35 million to the CDC to help state and local communities that have been impacted most by the coronavirus.

March 6: President Trump signed an $8.3 billion bill to fight the coronavirus outbreak.

The bill provides $7.76 billion to federal, state, & local agencies to combat the coronavirus and authorizes an additional $500 million in waivers for Medicare telehealth restrictions.

March 9: President Trump called on Congress to pass a payroll tax cut over coronavirus.

March 10: President Trump and VP Pence met with top health insurance companies and secured a commitment to waive co-pays for coronavirus testing.

March 11: President Trump:

  • Announced travel restrictions on foreigners who had visited Europe in the last 14 days.
     
  • Directed the Small Business Administration to issue low-interest loans to affected small businesses and called on congress to increase this fund by $50 billion.
     
  • Directed the Treasury Department to defer tax payments for affected individuals & businesses, & provide $200 billion in “additional liquidity.”
     
  • Met with American bankers at the White House to discuss coronavirus.

Note: The travel ban once again contains the same huge loophole that the China one does as seen below.

March 13: President Trump declared a national emergency in order to access $42 billion in existing funds to combat the coronavirus.

March 13: President Trump announced:

  • Public-private partnerships to open up drive-through testing collection sites.
     
  • A pause on interest payments on federal student loans.
     
  • An order to the Department of Energy to purchase oil for the strategic petroleum reserve.

I was going to post the other seven pages listed on the campaign website, but you get the picture. Now, as you read that list, try and decide what items really made a difference, actually did something tangible and concrete, vs being some administrative thing that may have moved the ball along, but didn’t result in a major milestone.

For instance:

February 3: The CDC had a team ready to travel to China to obtain critical information on the novel coronavirus, but were in the U.S. awaiting permission to enter by the Chinese government.

China had already given the genetic map of the virus to the WHO a month earlier, and that was the most important info they had. I’m not sure why this is relevant.


February 29: The Trump Administration:

  • Announced a level 4 travel advisory to areas of Italy and South Korea.
     
  • Barred all travel to Iran.
     
  • Barred the entry of foreign citizens who visited Iran in the last 14 days.



The first US case of Covid 19 in the US was identified on January 20th 2020. Eleven days later, the Trump administration reacted by restricting  “foreign nationals who had been in China in the last 14 days” from entering the country. Of course, that left the door wide open for US citizens to travel back and forth. Note that criticism comes from the Conservative Washington Times. A few days later, Trump “reassures” the nation by saying “Well, we pretty much shut it down coming in from China. … We can’t have thousands of people coming in who may have this problem, the coronavirus. So we’re gonna see what happens, but we did shut it down, yes.” Obviously a false statement. But he believed it because he wants it to be true. And traveling TO Iran??? Who was even doing that? And how does that help the US as were are concerned about who is coming in.

March 3: The CDC lifted federal restrictions on coronavirus testing to allow any American to be tested for coronavirus, “subject to doctor’s orders.”

That’s great, except we didn’t hardly have any tests.

If you look at the entire list on the campaign site, it becomes clear the Trump administration did a whole bunch of stuff, but didn’t know what they were doing and fails us all.

On the topic of China… They screwed up. Big time. I’m not going to go into detail here as that’s been covered elsewhere. They did do one substantial thing that was very important. China delivered the genetic coding of the Covid 19 virus to the WHO on January 11th, which it promptly shared with health officials and departments of countries all over the world. By January 16th, the Germans were already starting to distribute a test kit to detect this new virus. A day later, the WHO published the protocol provided by the Germans on duplicating the test. This way other countries could immediately start producing and distributing test kits of their own without reinventing the wheel. By February 28th, South Korea had tested 65,00. China was ramping up its test rate to 1.6 million a week.

What did the United State do under the leadership of Donald Trump?

Try and reinvent the wheel.

I have no problem with the US making their own test.

Meanwhile, eleven days after the first case of N1H1, the CDC under the Obama administration was already nearing completion of a working reliable test. That would be released on May 1st.

The Obama administration did a MUCH BETTER job of dealing with the H1N1 challenge than Trump has done with Covid 19.

His statements underscore that he didn’t think this would be a big deal. On February 26, over a month after the first case was found in the US, he tweeted: “Because of all we’ve done, the risk to the American people remains very low. … When you have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero. That’s a pretty good job we’ve done.”

Now it is true that China is responsible for letting this get out of control and spreading outside it’s borders. And South Korea IS a much smaller country, which makes things a little easier to deal with. But once it came to ours, which was at some point inevitable, our government is then responsible for what happens at that point. And we STIILL have a President who doesn’t take this seriously. He insists that private enterprise will swoop in and save the day with no central planning or involvement, and will not invoke the Defense Production Act. The typical supply-side approach.

Private enterprise can, and will will do some great things to help deal with this disastrous outbreak. But consider this; after the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese, and our entry into World War Two, it wasn’t private enterprise that save us. The Federal Government took over pretty much EVERY needed aspect of manufacturing in this country and focused it in order to build/ manufacture the military supplies needed to get into the war as soon as possible. That type of approach is completely missing here. Yes, Ford GE, and a number of companies are starting to work together to build ventilators and other medical equipment, but their own estimates are that they won’t be ready until June. We need supplies NOW. We need testing NOW. But, unlike South Korea, which recognized the dire threat immediately, this administration ignored those in this country that did, and now he’s throwing the states to the wolves by not serving the needs of the entire country.

Yeah. I’m a “Trump hater” I guess. But the fact remains that had this administration not disbanded the pandemic panel, had we accepted help from other countries, testing supplies from the W.H.O., instead of doing the whole AMERICA FIRST routine, we could be much farther along in fighting this epidemic.

Mar
26
2020

Test

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I’m just testing to see if my links to outside media will work now. I was having problems before and i figured being home with a bad cold is a perfect time to fix any problems.

What about this? Mapping the virus spread.

Mar
26
2020

GETTING DOWN WITH THE SICKNESS

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So, I’m home today, essential services be damned.

Why?

It appears I have a mild cold or flu. Runny nose, sneezing sometimes, bit of a sore throat. I do have a little bit of a cough, but it’s a “wet” cough. I mention that because the cough that develops in a Covid infection is a dry cough. I also haven’t developed a fever. As of this morning, my temp is 97.7f. There of course is overlap in symptoms between the two ailments, so nothing can be rules out. It just sucks that I can’t get tested to see if it’s Corona or not. I’m thinking about getting tested for flu. That would confirm or rule out what it is or isn’t.
Sucks that we don’t have widespread testing in this area.

UPDATE: Temp this afternoon was 98.4f. Temp tonight is again 97.7f. Fever is one of the primary signs of Covid. Hope I’m not jinxing things but… So far so good.

DAY 2: Morning temp is 97.7f. Still have the slight cough. I expect some radioactive waste to be coming out in due time. Afternoon i forgot to check. Evening was, once again 97.7. I’m not sure if I’ve ever been so consistent in my life?

Mar
23
2020

I’m Not Dead!!!!

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Just busy with things like still working and filling the “shelter in place” family time and FINALLY recording scratch tracks for my solo record.

Sep
30
2019

Musician Jokes – The Master List

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Q: How do you make musicians complain?
A: Pay them.

Q: How many conductors does it take to screw in a light bulb?
A: No one knows, no one ever looks at him.

Q: whats the differance between a pianist and god?
A: god doesn’t think he’s a pianist

Q: how many drummers does it take to change a light bulb?
A: “oops, i broke it!”

Q:Whats the difference between Terrorists and Accordion players?
A:Terrorists have sympathizers

Q:How many Folk Singers does it take to change a light bulb?
A:One to change it and 5 to sing about how good the old one was

Q: What do you call a beautiful woman on a trombonist’s arm?
A: A tattoo.

Q: What’s the difference between a banjo and an onion?
A: Nobody cries when you chop up a banjo.

Q: What do you call a drummer in a three-piece suit?
A: “The Defendant”

Q: What do clarinetists use for birth control?
A: Their personalities.

Q: What do call Bach?
A: Dead.

Q: What did the drummer get on his I.Q. Test?
A: Saliva.

Q: What do call a guitar player without a girlfriend?
A: Homeless.

Two brass players walked out of a bar…

Q: What do you get when you drop a piano into a mine shaft?
A: A Flat Miner

Q: What’s the similarity between a drummer and a philosopher?
A: They both perceive time as an abstract concept.

Q: Why was the musician arrested?
A: He was in treble

Q: What is the difference between a drummer and a vacuum cleaner?
A: You have to plug one of them in before it sucks.

Q: Why do some people have an instant aversion to banjo players?
A: It saves time in the long run.

Q: What’s the difference between a folk guitar player and a large pizza?
A: A large pizza can feed a family of four.

Q: What’s the difference between a jet airplane and a trumpet?
A: About three decibels.

Q: What’s the latest crime wave in New York City?
A: Drive-by trombone solos.

Q: What’s the definition of a minor second interval?
A: Two Soprano Sax players reading off the same part.

Q: What is another term for trombone?
A: A wind driven, manually operated, pitch approximator.

Q: How do you get an oboist to play A flat?
A: Take the batteries out of his electronic tuner.

Q: What is the dynamic range of a bass trombone?
A: On or off.

Q: What’s the difference between a SCUD missile and a bad oboist?
A: A bad oboist can kill you.

Q: Why do clarinetists leave their cases on the dashboard?
A: So they can park in the handicapped zones.

Q: What’s the definition of perfect pitch?
A: When you toss a banjo in the garbage and it hits an accordion.

Q: What’s the difference between an opera singer and a pit bull?
A: Lipstick.

Q: Why do people play trombone?
A: Because they can’t move their fingers and read music at the same time.

Q: How does a violist’s brain cell die?
A: Alone.

Two drummers walk past a bar…

Q: What do you call a guitar player that only knows two chords?
A: A music critic.

Q: How do you keep your violin from being stolen?
A: Put it in a viola case.

Q: What’s the difference between a saxophone and a chainsaw?
A: You can tune a chainsaw.

Q: What will you never say about a banjo player?
A: “That’s the banjo player’s Porsche.”

Q: What do a viola and a lawsuit have in common?
A: Everyone is relieved when the case is closed.

Q: Why are harps like elderly parents?
A: Both are unforgiving and hard to get into and out of cars.

Q: How many trumpet players does it take to pave a driveway?
A: Seven- if you lay them out correctly.

Q: What’s the difference between an oboe and a bassoon?
A: You can hit a baseball further with a bassoon.

Q: How are a banjo player and a blind javelin thrower alike?
A: Both command immediate attention and alarm, and force everyone to move out of range.

Q: What’s the best recording of the Walton Viola Concerto?
A: “Music Minus One”

Q: What’s the difference between a Wagnerian soprano and a baby elephant?
A: Eleven pounds.

Q: Why are violist’s fingers like lightning?
A: They rarely strike the same spot twice.

Q: How many guitar players does it take to screw in a light bulb?
A: 13 – one to do it, and twelve to stand around and say, “Phhhwt! I can do that!”

Tuba Player: “Did you hear my last recital?”
Friend: “I hope so.”

Q: What’s the difference between alto clef and Greek?
A: Some conductors actually read Greek.

Q: How many concertmasters does it take to change a light bulb?
A: Just one, but it takes four movements.

Q: What do you call a Tubist correctly noticing the key signature?
A: Astute.

Q: What do you call a tubist actually playing the correct key signature?
A: Gifted.

Q: How can a drummer and a conductor avoid rhythm conflicts?
A: Work separate concert halls.

Glissando: A technique adopted by string players for difficult runs.

Perfect Pitch: When you throw a viola into the toilet and it doesn’t hit the sides.

Relative minor: A guitarist’s girlfriend.

Q: How does a young man become a member of a high school chorus?
A: On the first day of school he turns into the wrong classroom.

Subito piano: Indicates an opportunity for some obscure orchestra player to become a soloist.

Musica ficta: When you lose your place and have to bluff until you find it again.

Vibrato: Used by singers to hide the fact that they are on the wrong pitch.

Did you hear about the Tenor who was so arrogant the other Tenors noticed?

Q: What do you call a hundred conductors at the bottom of the Ocean?
A: A good start.

Q: Barenboim, Levine and Mehta all went down in a plane crash. Who survived?
A: Mozart.

Q: What’s the difference between a Lawnmower and a Viola?
A: Vibrato

Q: How can you tell when a singer is at your door?
A: The can’t find the key, and they never know when to come in.

Q: How do you get two bass players to play in unison?
A: Hand them charts a half-step apart.

Q: What’s the difference between a dead chicken in the road, and a dead trombonist in the road?
A: There’s a remote chance the chicken was on its way to a gig.

Q: What do you call someone who hangs around with musicians?
A: A vocalist.

Q: If you see a conductor and a violist in the middle of the road, who would you run over first?
A: The conductor, business before pleasure.

Q: How do you get a guitarist to play softer?
A: Place a sheet of music in front of him.

Q: Why can’t voice majors have colostomies?
A: Because they can’t find shoes to match the bag.

Q: What do you do if you see a bleeding drummer running around in your back yard?
A: Stop laughing and shoot again.

Q: How many 2nd violinists does it take to change a light bulb?
A: None, they can’t get up that high !!!!!!

Soprano Sofege: do, re, mi, me, Me, Not You, ME!!

Q: What’s the perfect weight of a conductor?
A: Three and one-half pounds, including the urn.

Q: What do all great conductors have in common?
A: They’re all dead

Q: What’s the definition of optimisim?
A: A bass trombonist with a beeper.

Q: What do you do if you run over a bass player?
A: Back up.

Q: How do you reduce wind-drag on a trombonist’s car?
A: Take the Domino’s Pizza sign off the roof

Q: How do you get a clarinetist out of a tree?
A: Cut the noose

Q: What do you throw a drowning bass player?
A: His amp.

Q: How do you get a three piece horn section to play in tune?
A: Shoot two of therm.

Q: What’s the difference between a bull and a band?
A: The bull has the horns in the front and the ******* in the back.

Q: How many vocalists does it take to screw in a bulb?
A: None. They hold the bulb over their head and the world revolves around them.

Q: How many drummers does it take to screw in a bulb?
A: None, they have machines for that now.

Q: How can you tell if the stage is level?
A: The drool comes out of both sides of the drummers mouth.

Q: How do you get a trombonist off of your porch?
A: Pay him for the pizza.

Q: What’s the last thing a drummer says before he gets kicked out of a band?
A: “When do we get to play MY songs?”

Q: What’s the difference between a tuba and a vacumn cleaner?
A: You have to turn one of them on before it sucks.

Q: How do you define a perfect pitch?
A: When the Saxaphone lands in the MIDDLE of the dumpster.

Q: What do you call a musician with a college degree?
A: Night manager at McDonalds

Q: Why are violas larger than violins?
A: They aren’t. Violists heads are smaller.

Q: How are trumpet players like pirates?
A: They’re both murder on the high Cs.

Q: A violin and a viola are both in a burning building, in the same room, which burns first?
A: The violin because the viola was in its case.

Q: What’s the difference between a dog and a violinist?
A: A dog knows when to quit scratching.

Q: How do you get a trumpet to sound like a french horn?
A: Put your hand in the bell and play a lot of wrong notes.

Q: How does one trumpet player greet another?
A: “Hi. I’m better than you.”

Q: How do you know when a drummer is at your door ?
A: He speeds up when hes knocking

Q: How many guitar players does it to take to change a lightbulb?
A: 5 …. One to change and 4 to say they could have done it better